slide

Hoping they’ll lose Pinterest

The people who introduced me to blogging were not scientists or academics. They were online friends I’d met through playing games. A few of them set up their first blogs in 2001, and I thought it looked fun, so I started one as well. It was on an archaic blogging...
slide

Would I eat that?

It’s something I rarely talk about, but this year is my 10th anniversary of being vegetarian. I don’t know exactly when, because it was a very gradual process. I started slowly phasing out meat from my diet in the late nineties, but lapsed in early 2001, when I was staying...
slide

Book Review – Geek Nation

I’ve never been to India, but I did change planes at the airport in Delhi on my way to Kathmandu this summer. Delhi airport looks like every other major international airport, with a Body Shop, WH Smith, and Costa Coffee. The shops accepted American dollars, but gave change in rupees....
slide

Make history, not vitamin C

(This post was previously hosted on my old blog at http://blogs.nature.com/eva and is published in print in The Best Science Writing Online 2012) “Does the Flap of a Butterfly’s Wings in Brazil Set Off a Tornado in Texas?” - Edward Lorenz This is a story about a tiny molecular shift...
slide

The Etymology of SciBarCamb

By far the most frequently asked question about SciBarCamb (or about SciBarCamp with a p) is “Bar?” and the answer is long. So long, that it takes several minutes to answer in person, and several paragraphs to answer in writing. To avoid at least ever having to type it again,...
slide

A metaphor for science and technology

Forget about art and science – this century has a whole new two world problem. It’s been nagging me for a while – at science online conferences (both the London and North Carolina varieties), in talks with lab mates, at work at a scientific publisher, and hanging out with technology-oriented...
slide

The biggest petri dish in the universe

I admit, I just clicked the link on the BBC news site because it said something about “beer”, but it turned out to not be about the drink, but a town. Bill Bryson was right – English towns really do have the strangest names… “Bacteria taken from cliffs at Beer...
slide

Dream

I had the strangest dream last night. I don’t remember all of it, but there was a skeleton of a dinosaur with a fake nose and flamingos on it, and I was walking underneath a space ship with some people, and later a journalist poured me wine in a water...
slide

Now run along, and don’t get into mischief

It’s Ada Lovelace Day, on which we’re encouraged to blog about women in science and technology. Having been a woman in fields from chemistry to biology, I’ve never felt out of place at all. My undergrad chemistry department was almost 50% female, and in 1998 I was one of five...
slide

Drums and Neuroscience

I have another interview up on the Musicians and Scientists site, and it’s yet again a Nature Network blogger , although I had him on my list because of something he wrote pre-NN. (I tried to also get a few non-bloggers in before I left the Toronto time-zone, but that...