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Who benefits from science blogging?

by Eva Amsen

Earlier this summer I interviewed five science bloggers for an article I was writing about science blogging. The article is out now in the latest issue of Hypothesis Journal. Go read it!
It includes interviews with Pharyngula’s P.Z. Myers, Aetiology’s Tara Smith, the girls of Inky Circus, The Loom’s Carl Zimmer, and Nature Newsblog’s Oliver Morton. They were all very friendly and helpful in answering my questions, so thank you, science bloggers!

The rest of the issue of Hypothesis is also very interesting, partly because it’s the most international issue so far, with contributions from India and Israel. So far we’ve mostly received contributions from within UofT, but slowly more people are hearing about the journal.

I say “we”, because I’ve also been promoted from the general editorial team to chief editor of Hypothesis as of this issue. I didn’t review my own article though, that’s not how it works!

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5 comments

Shelley September 15, 2006 - 9:57 PM

Chief editor, that’s so cool! I like Hypothesis, but I’m sure that’s not surprising.

Reply
Pedro Beltrao September 17, 2006 - 10:00 AM

I hope in time more people would actually publish results on blogs (or something like blogs). This would allow a more open , real time science, instead of the current model where everyone hides their work for 2-3 years before the papers come out. We end up wasting resources like this because it is impossible to know who is working on what problems at from what angle.

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Maxine September 19, 2006 - 7:32 AM

Hi Eva
I am trying to follow the links you provide to download the article now, but keep getting page not found. (for the journal and the pdf) Do they work OK for you?
Best wishes
Maxine.

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Link Digest: Catch-up edition « Migrations September 21, 2006 - 7:09 PM

[…] And Eva of EasternBlot has an article in the Hypothesis Journal: Who benefits from science blogging. Explore posts in the same categories: Link Digest […]

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Anton Zuiker September 22, 2006 - 10:05 PM

Great article, and something we’ll link to and reference at the just-announced Triangle Science Blogging Conference Jan 20, 2007 in Chapel HIll, NC. Details at .

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